426 – The Chasm of Night

And now, in a continuing service, an entry from the Encyclopedia Ardrisia…

THE CHASM OF NIGHT

Few locales inspire as much deep-seated fear as The Chasm of Night. In the first age after the world was created, two of the greater gods waged a terrible battle. On one side was Kelamane, God of Honor, Light, Righteous War, Selflessness, and Law. On the other side was Kistadous, King of Demons and God of Evil, Malice, Tyranny and Vengeance. What they fought over is unknown, as the priests of Kelamane are tight-lipped on the subject and Kilanio University Press does not pay anywhere near well enough for this chronicler to risk her life to ask Kistadous’ “priests.”

Finally, Kelamane got the upper hand on Kistadous and hurled his enemy’s broken body from the heavens to the world below them. The Chasm of Night is where Kistadous landed, shaking the earth and tearing a great wound into it. Over 1,500 miles long, The Chasm of Night is shrouded by a perpetual bank of dark, evil-smelling fog. It is widely believed that there is no bottom to the Chasm and that where the vile canyon’s floor should be is instead a tear in reality that leads to Kistadous’ lair in the Underworld. Strangely, the Chasm’s exact depth is unknown, as no explorers have ever come back to report an accurate measurement.

In recent times, the outer edges of the Chasm have become the home for many bands of thieves, murderers and tax dodgers. On occasion, demonic abominations will come surging up from the depths to wreak unholy havoc on the surface. The modern day countries that border the Chasm (Val’Dhar, the Imperial Protectorate of Gahl-Nabar, Mikiltuum and Tarokka) have outposts designed to repel such attacks, with varying success. Of these, the only one that has remained in one piece for longer than 5 years is the elven outpost of Arnisal’s Vigil, which is also known for their aebleskiver, which makes braving hordes of mucous-demons almost worth it. Almost.

The Encyclopedia Ardrisia , Volume 4 (Candletakers to Czarn Keep), Kilanio University Press, 48th edition.

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